Testate amoebae from the end of the earth!

From inside the shell

Contributed by Matt Amesbury

The use of testate amoebae as a proxy for past changes in the hydrological status of peatlands has become ever more popular over the past two decades. Studies have been carried out over an increasing geographical range covering most major areas of northern hemisphere peatlands as well as in Patagonia and New Zealand amongst other places south of the equator. Despite this pushing of “amoebal” boundaries, there is one place you might certainly expect to be able to rule out moss-based testate studies: Antarctica.

Only a tiny 0.3% of the Antarctic continent is ice free, yet in parts of this seemingly minute slither, the climate is just about amenable enough to have permitted the formation of deep moss banks; accumulations of moss that grow a few millimetres each year and are then frozen stiff over the winter months only to thaw out in the…

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Posted on January 16, 2014, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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